Helsinki (27.09.2022 - Heikki Jokinen) Since 2005, the Summer Job Helpline has been helping young people doing their summer job. The service is run by the three Finnish trade union confederations Akava, SAK and STTK.

Pay, working hours and employment contracts and how to terminate them, were the most frequently asked questions, says Hanna-Marilla Zidan on the SAK website. She ran the service from 2 May to 31 August.

Of those who contacted the Helpline, 72 per cent were summer workers. One out of five were parents and five per cent employers.

Helsinki (19.09.2022 - Heikki Jokinen) The deadlock in nurses' collective bargaining led to a new law restricting the right to strike and has caused serious friction in the Government.

Tehy and Super, the nurses' unions, announced five limited strikes in intensive care units and home care, to begin in September. This did not speed up the collective bargaining process, instead the employers asked the courts to outlaw strikes.

The Helsinki District Court promptly accepted requests from three hospital districts to delay the nurses' strikes at hospital intensive care units, but not in regard to home care. The reason for this ruling was the great risk to patients, and possibility of fatalities.

Helsinki (09.09.2022 - Heikki Jokinen) In June, the two nurses' unions Tehy and Super pulled out of the major municipal sector collective agreement. Presently, collective bargaining for the nurses’ is ongoing, but the debate around the deal is getting heated.

Tehy - The Union of Health and Social Care Professionals in Finland and Super - the Finnish Union of Practical Nurses are clear in their demands: nurses must get a real pay rise in order to solve the growing shortage of nurses. For the unions, this is a matter of patient security.

Aki Lindén, the social democratic Minister of Family Affairs and Social Services has taken a stance on the issue. He had already started preparing the Patient Safety Act, which would force nurses, in some cases, to work and thus limiting their right to strike.

Helsinki (02.09.2022 - Heikki Jokinen) Forestry giant UPM adamantly refuses to engage in collective bargaining with their salaried employees. Since the beginning of this year, they have not had any collective agreement whatsoever.

According to the UPM press release last December, "defining terms of employment without collective agreement gives the same starting point and possibilities for everyone".

Now, UPM has had time to translate this into reality as there is no collective agreement for their salaried employees in Finland. Their actions seem to be based on a policy of divide and rule.